Why are we here?

We are High School students selected from around the country to follow in the footsteps of Sir Peter Blake to a place he cared deeply about: the Southern Ocean and Sub-Antarctic. We are going to one of the most remote and biodiverse spots on the planet, the Auckland Islands. This untouched region has much to teach NZ and the world around climate change and ocean health. While on board HMNZS Otago we are “in the NAVY” and have a team of leading Scientists and experts guiding us every step of the way.

Our Explorers

Aidan Braid
Aidan Braid

Logan Park High School, Dunedin

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Ben Pigott
Ben Pigott

Palmerston North Boys’ High School

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Guy McDonald
Guy McDonald

Timaru Boys High School

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Isla Christensen
Isla Christensen

Karamu High School, Hastings

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Jessica Yule
Jessica Yule

Queen Margaret College, Wellington

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Nina Santos
Nina Santos

Auckland Girls’ Grammar School

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Oxana Repina
Oxana Repina

Rutherford College

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Raven Maeder
Raven Maeder

Nelson College for Girls

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Sam Kilsby
Sam Kilsby

Otago Boys’ High School

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Shahin Najak
Shahin Najak

Lynfield College, Auckland

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Shannon Williams
Shannon Williams

Wellington Girls College

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Simran Rughani
Simran Rughani

Birkenhead College, Auckland

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Tama-Hauti Potaka
Tama-Hauti Potaka

Rotorua Boys High School

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Tim Rutherford
Tim Rutherford

Wellington College

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Gary Wilson
Gary Wilson

Expedition Leader & Scientific Project Director

Hannah Prior
Hannah Prior

Chief Operating Officer

Sheelagh James
Sheelagh James

Expedition Doctor

Jacob Anderson
Jacob Anderson

Communications/Media

Amelia Willis
Amelia Willis

Department of Conservation Liaison

Shay Van Der Hurk
Shay Van Der Hurk

Department of Conservation

Isobel Ewing
Isobel Ewing

Journalist

Cherie Fenemor
Cherie Fenemor

Educator at Sea

Brendon O’Hagan
Brendon O’Hagan

Cameraman/Editor

Harry Josephson-Rutter
Harry Josephson-Rutter

Marine Scientist

Amanda Brown
Amanda Brown

Natural Resources Engineer

Rebecca McLeod
Rebecca McLeod

Marine Ecologist

Sally Carson
Sally Carson

Marine Biologist

Craig Cary
Craig Cary

Microbial Ecologist

Latest Update
Nina Santos

We are a few clicks away from the dock in Dunedin, we are on track to arrive at Ports of Otago at 1000 hours....

4 months ago

Current Weather
Cloudy - Sun Icon

Cloudy - Sun

10°c

Temp

km/h

Wind

%

Chance of Rain

Latest Co-ordinates

50.5115° S

166.2828° E

Teachers: Connect your Classroom

Classrooms and students can connect and engage in this Young Blake Expedition by following our blogs, photos, and videos as they come in or you could “Ring an Explorer”. Find out how to schedule a phone call via SAT phone here.

Find out more

Ask an explorer

We would love to hear your questions and queries, just fill out the details below and we will get back to you with an answer!

Who is answering your questions today?
Sam Kilsby
Sam Kilsby

Otago Boys’ High School

Sub-Antarctic Voyage 2016

Throw us a question about our voyage & research, and our explorer on duty will answer it as soon as they are in range.

Q: After the 5 days on the ship when you got back on land did it feel like you were still on the ship? - Waikowhai School
A: Some people noticed no difference, but for others the land was rolling like the swell of the ocean. Some even struggled to keep their footing and needed to sit down once they landed on Auckland Island! I don’t think anyone got land sick though.

Q: What is the coldest temperature at night time? - Waikowhai School
A: The temperature has got down to about 5 degrees at night. That may not seem too cold to some people, but considering it is the height of summer here, and the wind is howling through at up to 120kph, it feels absolutely freezing! We were all wearing lots of layers!

Q: How many times have you been fishing and what did you catch? What type of equipment do you use for fishing? - Waikowhai School
A: We have been fishing twice. On the Ranfurly Banks we caught Kingfish, which was fun even though most of them were under size and had to be put back. In Port Pegasus (Stewart Island) the ship’s company (and a couple of our crew) fished for Blue Cod. We use hooks, lines, and lures.

Q: Are you having fun? why? - Waikowhai School
A: We are definitely having fun! We have a fantastic crew of fellow students from all around New Zealand, and of scientists and leaders in other fields who have lots to teach us. We’re enjoying seeing a part of New Zealand that most Kiwis will never get to see, and spending time with the Navy, learning about the ship, their jobs and trades, racing around in the RHIBS, fishing, swimming and more. It’s a real adventure out here. Every day is different and we don’t want it to end!

Q: Are you missing your family members? - Waikowhai School
A: We miss them but we know they want us to enjoy this amazing once-in-a-lifetime experience as much as possible, so we’re doing that!

Q: What marine life have you seen? - Waikowhai School
A: We have seen sea lions, seals and penguins, and lots of life in the intertidal zone as well – including crabs and limpets. We also did a number of plankton tows and analysed these under the microscope.

Q: Have you seen any nests with baby albatross? - Waikowhai School
A: We saw lots of Albatross in the air as we sailed across the Southern Ocean and whilst we were at anchor and out in small boats in the Auckland Islands. We didn’t see any albatross sitting on nests – but most of these are on Adams and Disappointment islands which we didn’t visit – and they may have been on Enderby too but we didn’t get close enough to see. What we did see were a number (up to 8 in one place) of albatross sitting and standing together and interacting with each other. They are spectacular birds!

Q: Is it starting to get much colder? What is the temperature there today? - Brad Guthrie
A: Temperature remains around ten degrees but with the winds blasting through from the South-West it feels much colder. Thank goodness for hot milo when we get back to the ship each day.

Q: Are the albatross nesting on the Auckland Islands now and have you seen any? - Shelley, Auckland
A: We see Albatross every day here – Sootys, Royals and maybe even some Black Browed with their black overwings and tails. They are spectacular birds. We’ve only seen them in the air so far but hope to see a few nests when we’re on Enderby Island later this week.

Q: How many days you will stay 'on station' before setting off for return to Dunedin? Regards to all & here's hoping the weather stays fair! - Maurie & Jenny Daly
A: Hi there, we are expecting to wake up in the Auckland Islands tomorrow morning (Saturday) and will arrive alongside Polaris (the Floating University) which is already there carrying out scientific research. We will spend about 4 days in the Sub-Antarctic Islands, and will set off for the mainland next Wednesday evening.

Q: How are everyone's sea legs? Has anyone gotten sea sick yet? - Zane, Auckland
A: Seas were calm this morning heading past Stewart Island, but the weather has turned and theres a bunch of people experiencing seasickness. They are all fine, but it will be an early night for most, as taking to your bunk is recommended in these conditions for a Southern Ocean crossing. We will reach the Auckland Islands by morning. So stoked to be waking up there!

Q: How long does the trip take? - Tomas Bain, Dunedin
A: It takes about 5 days to get down to the Auckland Islands from Auckland. Our explorers left on Tuesday 2 February and will get home on Friday 12 February.

Q: Hello, I was wondering what the process is to join the Sir Peter Blake environment group? I'm a year 13 student and have heard about this through the school - Georgia McNeill
A: Hi Georgia. To join the expeditions you need to have attended our Youth EnviroLeaders' Forum. Applications are open for this event now - visit http://sirpeterblaketrust.org/yelf

Q: Hi there! I wondered what you are eating on the ship, and do you all help with the cooking? - Kelly, Auckland
A: We eat like kings on the ship. There always a couple of meat options – including spaghetti bolognaise, tandoori chicken, lamb koftas, chops and thai curry so far – and a selection of salads, vegetables, desserts and fresh fruit. The cheffies work hard all day getting the meals ready and a couple of us have assisted with peeling potatoes and baking cookies. Student voyagers as rostered on to assist with the dishes – or slushy duty – each day as well. We know our parents would be really impressed that we’re not only doing the dishes, but doing them for our 80 shipmates!

Find us on instagram!

#ybe2016

Resources

Southern Right Whales
Southern Right Whales

Southern Right Whales - Tohora - Eubalaena Australis / By Bernard Potter & Dr. Will Rayment (University of Otago) read more..

Our Southern Wilderness Revealed
Our Southern Wilderness Revealed

An eco-system poster created by Nick Kingston & Artist Dave Gunson read more..

Clues to Past Climates
Clues to Past Climates

Reconstructing climate change / By Imogen Browne - Otago University read more..

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